The Secret to Silencing Anxiety

The Secret to Silencing Anxiety

Anxiety can be triggered in high-stress situations that produce a sense of uncertainty. When anxiety sets in, a fight-or-flight response occurs, resulting in behavioral changes. It's common for people with anxiety to avoid situations that provoke high-stress or uneasiness. Whether it's driving in traffic or taking an exam, we all face situations that stimulate unwanted responses. The first step in gaining control of your anxiety is to identify what sets it off and how you can counteract that little voice in your head. I have found that creating specific affirmations that I can verbally, or mentally, recite helps me overcome these moments of uncertainty. Below, I’ve provided a handy affirmation guide for a wide range of scenarios. 


School:

Students face elevated levels of anxiety throughout their educational experiences. The overwhelming burden of schoolwork, sleep deprivation and loneliness are factors that contribute to stress. Many students cope with skipping class or drinking caffeine, but there are healthier ways to fight this feeling. Finding resources on campus could be the first step to getting help for your anxiety. Many colleges offer study support, academic advising, mental health counseling and much more! Another tip I’ve found useful with my anxiety is practicing self-care. Maintaining healthy habits could be through exercise, skin-care and regular sleeping patterns. These factors can be a major mood changer in regards to stress. 

Daily Statements: 

I will pass my upcoming exam. 

I am intelligent. 

If I make a mistake, I will be ok. 

I am capable of healthier choices. 


Work: 

The workplace can be a stress-inducing place, especially if you doubt your belonging. People report that deadlines and co-workers are triggers for their anxiety. Remember that these feelings are normal, and definitely surmountable. The first step is understanding how you function in the workplace. Are you completing all your work? Do you interact effectively with your co-workers? Hone in on specific areas of doubt, so you can create a concrete plan for improvement. Don't forget to ask for help as well! If you need clarification on the project, don’t hesitate to ask. In the long run, you’ll feel much more at ease completing your work, knowing you did the best you can. 

Daily Statements: 

I can finish my work for the day. 

My co-workers support me. 

I will take time for myself after work. 

I have passion and motivation. 


Driving: 

Driving is a very common anxiety-inducing situation that many people face on a daily basis. Whether it's a traffic jam or loud honking, many people avoid the downfalls of driving at all costs. Positive affirmations can be the first start being stepping in the car. Tell yourself “you can” and “you will” make it to that destination. Another useful tip is just becoming comfortable in the car. Turn on your favorite audiobook or talk to a friend before driving. The most useful tool I’ve found to manage my driving anxiety is to eat beforehand. Take care of your body and avoid driving on an empty stomach. 

Daily Statements: 

I am a good driver. 

I feel calm and confident behind the wheel.

My driving gets better every day. 

I respect other drivers on the road. 


Traveling:

Traveling should be an exciting experience, but anxiety can get in the way. Traveling, especially to unfamiliar places, can induce stress due to the numerous unknown factors. That’s why the best option is to plan beforehand. Organize your money, medication, travel guide, etc. If you have anxiety traveling alone, bring a friend! Traveling with someone can ease stress and potentially make you more adventurous! 

Daily Statements: 

I am in control and I have my resources. 

Exploring makes me strong and confident. 

I will let my curiosity bring me to new things. 

I can have a great time on vacation. 


Social Anxiety:

Social interactions often make people with anxiety suffer in silence. Whether it's going to a party or having a family dinner, social anxiety is real and pervasive. I know it’s hard not to overthink in social situations, but there are ways to control this. Be mindful by remaining present in the moment. Challenging those negative thoughts will help reduce these symptoms. Another useful tip is to congratulate yourself after attending a group setting. Be proud of yourself and celebrate your success. 

Daily Statements: 

It’s easy meeting new people. 

I feel comfortable in crowds. 

Conversation is fun for me.

I am a friendly person. 

 

Dealing with anxiety in different situations can be hard, but it is achievable. Keep practicing these statements in the situations to develop healthy habits to combat your anxious thoughts. 


Written By: Chloe West

 


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