4 Steps to Survive a Period of Change

4 Steps to Survive a Period of Change

Change in life is natural, and it happens all around us, and constantly. Being human means acknowledging and learning about change: the seasons, schools, friend groups, and relationships. These are things that we are taught from a young age. For some people, change is as easy as breathing. They can go with the flow like it’s what they were born to do! But what if you’re not like that? For some, change is not easy or exciting. No matter how many transitions they experience, the thought of change fills them with intense anxiety. If this sounds like you, here are four things you can do to calm your nerves. 

1. Breath

This may sound obvious, we often find ourselves overcome with anxiety, our breathing becomes shallow and infrequent. If you catch yourself starting to do this, try and consciously make sure you are taking deep breaths. If you are still having trouble regulating your breathing, try breathing in for four counts, hold for six counts, and then out for 8 counts. These counts can be altered to your comfort, the main goal is to slow your breathing without struggle.

2. Speak Up

You are surrounded by people that value your wellbeing and mental health. Don’t be afraid to let them know that whatever change you are experiencing is making you anxious. Even if they don’t know exactly what to do, they can offer a source of comfort and stability during transitional period. Talking about what you’re feeling out loud makes it easier for you to pinpoint what, exactly, about change is causing you anxiety. 

3. You don’t have to let go of everything 

One of the main reasons change causes anxiety is due to the fear of losing everything we once knew, everything that was comfortable. This doesn't have to be true. It’s okay to keep mementos of what used to be to remind you of those times. Whether it’s photos, a certain item, or maybe even a piece of clothing, cherish these reminders of the past. Just because change is happening around you, doesn’t mean that all of your personal items have to change as well. 

4. Create a Routine 

If the change you’re experiencing involves you being in a new place, establish a routine before you leave. Carry a similar routine over to your new place to create a sense of normalcy even though you are somewhere unfamiliar. This will help make the change feel less foreign and provide you a sense of comfort. 


Written by: Alexa Rosenberger

Instagram: @lex.gabrielle_

Twitter: @alexagabrie11e

2 comments


  • Viki

    Sorry not helping at all vague advice my 9 yeard olf cousing says


  • Lexie

    This helped a lot <33


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